Childhood Superstitions

It’s Friday the 13th the day for childish superstitions. Fortunately most rational adults don’t believe such nonsense or believe the fairy stories they were told by their parents when they were children.

But one person who hasn’t outgrown such childishness is Spitoon’s Leesa Gazi. Here she is talking about the fiction of mass rape during the 1971 war. Her evidence?: ”My father told me”:

Disgracefully all this falsehood took place during a serious conference on the very real issue of rape in war held in London.

Here are some pictures of Leesa laughing as she plans her vile hatred:

 

'' Hahahaha...You expect anyone to believe the lightly armed Pakistani army raped 200,000 women AND fought a terrorist insurgency''

”Hahahaha…You expect anyone to believe the lightly armed Pakistani army raped 200,000 women AND fought a terrorist insurgency”

 

''We need more funding from Muslim haters..add another zero to the made up 1971 war rape figures''

”We need more funding from Muslim haters..add another zero to the made up 1971 war rape figures”

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2 Responses to Childhood Superstitions

  1. Ajmol says:

    The Birangonas UK visa application has just been accepted…… whoreay !!!!!! No wait its a rejection letter 😦 Sorry girlies you’ve got return to loving East Pakistan.

    Like

  2. Brilliant! This is how Sarmila Bose overcame her childhood superstition and found the truth about the myth of mass rape and genocide in 1971
    ”As soon as I started to do systematic research on the 1971 war, I found that there was a problem with the story which I had grown up believing: from the evidence that emanated from the memories of all sides at the ground level, significant parts of the “dominant narrative” seem not to have been true. Many “facts” had been exaggerated, fabricated, distorted or concealed. Many people in responsible positions had repeated unsupported assertions without a thought; some people seemed to know that the nationalist mythologies were false and yet had done nothing to inform the public. I had thought I would be chronicling the details of the story of 1971 with which I had been brought up, but I found instead that there was a different story to be told.”
    http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/2011/05/20115983958114219.html

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